Coastal Protection

Preserving Habitats That Safeguard Shores


This goal measures the condition and extent of habitats that protect the coasts against storm waves and flooding.

Storm protection by coastal habitats is worth billions of dollars each year.


Global Goal Score

69

Annual Change

-
0.1
%

Likely Future State

+
0.3
%

Country Rankings


*The estimate of a goal’s likely near-term future status is a function
of four dimensions: Status, Trend, Pressure, and Resilience.


What Does This Score Mean?

The reference point for Coastal Protection compares the current extent and condition of five key habitats that protect coastlines (mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, salt marshes, tropical coral reefs, and sea ice) from flooding and erosion relative to their condition in the early 1980's.

A score of 100 would indicate that these habitats are all still intact or have been restored to the condition they were in during the early 1980’s. Any score below 100 indicates that these habitats have declined in coverage or in health since then, with lower scores indicating more significant declines.

Current Score

The current score indicates that although, in many places, these habitats remain healthy and intact, the extents of all five habitats have been substantially reduced or degraded when compared to the early 1980s reference years.

69


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Why Are Living Marine Habitats Important to Coastal Communities?
Download Infographic


How Is It Measured?

Each goal is evaluated on the basis of four dimensions
Present Status

Present Status is a goal's current value (based on the most recent available data) compared to a reference point.

Trend

Trend is the average percent change in the present status for the most recent 5 years of data.

Pressures

Pressures are the sum of the ecological and social pressures that negatively affect scores for a goal.

Resilience

Resilience is the sum of the ecological factors and social initiatives (policies, laws, etc) that can positively affect scores for a goal by reducing or eliminating pressures.


Pressures

Pressures are human-caused stressors that influence both ecological and social systems, negatively affecting the ability of a goal to deliver its benefits to people.


Status

Status refers to the current value of a goal relative to its goal-specific reference point. The reference point is the best condition for a goal that can reasonably be achieved; it is a target to aim for when taking actions to improve ocean health.


Resilience

Resilience refers to the social, institutional, and ecological factors that positively affect the ability of a goal to deliver its benefits to people.



References





PHOTO(S): © MARK MOFFETT/MINDEN PICTURES/National Geographic Stock
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