Food Provision

HARVESTING SEAFOOD SUsTAINABLY


This goal measures the amount of seafood captured or raised in a sustainable way.

Seafood helps more than half the world's population meet their need for protein.


Global Goal Score

33

Annual Change

+
0.2
%

Likely Future State

+
15
%

Country Rankings


*The estimate of a goal’s likely near-term future status is a function
of four dimensions: Status, Trend, Pressure, and Resilience.


Sub-Goals

Food Provision is divided into two sub-goals: Wild-caught commercial seafood and Mariculture, or ocean-farmed seafood. The more seafood harvested or cultured sustainably, the higher the goal score. The wild-caught commercial seafood sub-goal evaluates the ability to obtain maximal wild harvests without damaging the ocean’s ability to continue providing fish for people in the future. Sustainable harvest of wild-caught seafood avoids excessively high exploitation of target species, and does not target threatened populations. Additionally, pressures upon surrounding habitats and high bycatch may influence the resilience of the ecosystem and, indirectly, the productivity of the fisheries.

Sustainable mariculture supports food provisioning needs through practices that can be maintained over the long term. This includes not compromising the water quality in the farmed area and not relying on wild populations to feed or replenish the cultivated species.

Some mariculture practices, although they do not compromise future harvests, may impact the delivery of other goals, through habitat destruction and accidental release of non-native species. These factors do not affect the sustainability of mariculture, but their impact on the sustainability of other goals is captured as pressures when assessing such goals.


Select a sub goal
to learn more
  • Wild Caught Fisheries

    Global Goal Score

    31

    Annual Change

    +
    0.2
    %

    Likely Future State

    +
    17
    %

    *The estimate of a goal’s likely near-term future status is a function of four dimensions: Status, Trend, Pressure, and Resilience.


    What Does This Score Mean?

    This sub-goal assesses the amount of wild-caught seafood that can be sustainably harvested. The population biomass (the weight of fish in the ocean) of each landed stock is compared to the biomass that can deliver the stock’s maximum sustainable yield. The geometric mean of the values for all stocks in an area, each weighted by its proportional contribution to the total catch, gives the overall fisheries stock status for that area.

    The goal target is for countries to have their biomass of wild stocks within 5% of the amount that can sustainably deliver the maximum sustainable yield. Countries are penalized for both under- or over-harvesting. Penalties for under-harvesting are half as large as for over-harvesting.

    This method is a change from that used in 2012 and is explained further in Methods.

    Current Score

    The current score indicates that most countries are significantly below their sustainable target values. Some countries are jeopardizing their future landings with unsustainable yields, while others are not producing as much wild-caught seafood as they could.

    31


    N/A
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    Why  Are Wild-Caught Fisheries Vital to Food Provision?
    Download Infographic


    How Is It Measured?

    Each goal is evaluated on the basis of four dimensions
    Present Status

    Present Status is a goal's current value (based on the most recent available data) compared to a reference point.

    Trend

    Trend is the average percent change in the present status for the most recent 5 years of data.

    Pressures

    Pressures are the sum of the ecological and social pressures that negatively affect scores for a goal.

    Resilience

    Resilience is the sum of the ecological factors and social initiatives (policies, laws, etc) that can positively affect scores for a goal by reducing or eliminating pressures.


    Status

    Status refers to the current value of a goal relative to its goal-specific reference point. The reference point is the best condition for a goal that can reasonably be achieved; it is a target to aim for when taking actions to improve ocean health.


    Resilience

    Resilience refers to the social, institutional, and ecological factors that positively affect the ability of a goal to deliver its benefits to people.



    References



  • Mariculture

    Global Goal Score

    26

    Annual Change

    +
    1
    %

    Likely Future State

    +
    8
    %

    *The estimate of a goal’s likely near-term future status is a function of four dimensions: Status, Trend, Pressure, and Resilience.


    What Does This Score Mean?

    The reference point for mariculture uses harvested tonnes per coastal inhabitant (i.e. within the 50 KM coastal strip), under the assumption that production depends on the presence of coastal communities that can provide the labor force, infrastructures, and economic demand to support the development of mariculture facilities.

    The mariculture sub-goal assumes that coastal areas with appropriate social inputs for labor, coastal access, infrastructure and economic demand are potentially suitable for mariculture. High-resolution data on habitats, tides, currents, primary productivity, etc. at the global level will be needed to determine which species could actually be raised and what their productivity might be.

    A high score can mean that a country is sustainably harvesting as close to the maximum amount of farmed fish and seafood as possible based on its own potential. A low score can indicate one of two things – that seafood is being farmed in an unsustainable manner or that countries are not maximizing their potential to farm fish and other marine animals in their coastal territory.

    The score for each country indicates how close its current yield is to the score for the most productive country, which was Norway in 2013. This revised reference point for mariculture is explained in Methods.

    Current Score

    The current score indicates that most countries are not sustainably producing the amounts of farmed fish and seafood that they potentially could.

    However, it is important to note that the reference point is likely too high for most countries, due the fact that all near-shore habitat was included as "potentially suitable for mariculture". In reality, depending on the type of species cultivated, there are certain habitat requirements, but to predict them would require high resolution spatial information on habitat, currents, productivity, etc. that are not available at the global scale.

    26


    N/A
    0
    10
    20
    30
    40
    50
    60
    70
    80
    90


    Why is Mariculture Becoming Increasingly Important?
    Download Infographic


    How Is It Measured?

    Each goal is evaluated on the basis of four dimensions
    Present Status

    Present Status is a goal's current value (based on the most recent available data) compared to a reference point.

    Trend

    Trend is the average percent change in the present status for the most recent 5 years of data.

    Pressures

    Pressures are the sum of the ecological and social pressures that negatively affect scores for a goal.

    Resilience

    Resilience is the sum of the ecological factors and social initiatives (policies, laws, etc) that can positively affect scores for a goal by reducing or eliminating pressures.


    Pressures

    Pressures are human-caused stressors that influence both ecological and social systems, negatively affecting the ability of a goal to deliver its benefits to people.


    Status

    Status refers to the current value of a goal relative to its goal-specific reference point. The reference point is the best condition for a goal that can reasonably be achieved; it is a target to aim for when taking actions to improve ocean health.


    Resilience

    Resilience refers to the social, institutional, and ecological factors that positively affect the ability of a goal to deliver its benefits to people.



    References






PHOTO(S): © Marco Carè/Marine Photobank
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